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The University of Sydney

The University of Sydney, established in 1850, is the oldest of all the universities in Australia. The University is the second largest in Australia with approximately 33,000 students and its diversity of courses and degrees is unequalled on the continent. It provides a lively and challenging environment in which to pursue all aspects of academic life. The University boasts a first class research library and there are also dozens of departmental and school libraries of a more specialist nature.

The School of Mathematics and Statistics is located on the Camperdown campus of the University only three kilometres from the centre of Sydney. Sydney is the oldest and largest city in Australia, and the capital of New South Wales. The city has a population of 3.6 million and operates as an international centre for commerce, finance and the arts for the Asia-Pacific region. Sydney is well known for its great natural scenic beauty, beaches and climate, as well as its high quality of life.

The University also caters for many aspects of student life. It has nine colleges of residence for students and visiting scholars. It has two theatres, an art gallery, several museums and a thriving cultural life in all facets of the arts. For the physically active there is a wide range of sports facilities, including a covered full-size olympic pool, tennis and squash courts, two sporting ovals, gymnasiums, sports instructors and physiotherapists. Every effort is also made to accommodate the physically impaired.

The academic year begins in late February. It is divided into two semesters with a winter break of about three weeks from mid-June through to mid-July. Coursework programs finish at the end of November.

More details on the University of Sydney can be obtained from our Web site at

sydney.edu.au


next up previous
Next: The School of Mathematics Up: Postgraduate Handbook Previous: Postgraduate Handbook
Sydney Mathematics and Statistics, July 2001