SMS scnews item created by Di Warren at Wed 25 Jan 2017 1039
Type: Seminar
Modified: Sat 11 Feb 2017 0901; Sat 11 Feb 2017 0902; Sat 11 Feb 2017 0903; Sat 11 Feb 2017 0905; Mon 13 Feb 2017 0937; Tue 14 Feb 2017 0941
Distribution: World
Expiry: 14 Feb 2017
Calendar1: 14 Feb 2017 1100-1400
CalLoc1: Carslaw 535A
CalTitle1: Flip or Flop?
Auth: diwarren(.stother;2444.3002)@p5272.pc.maths.usyd.edu.au

INED/MASTER: Pardo, Bokosmaty -- Flip or Flop?

A seminar hosted jointly by INED and MASTER, for everyone interested in considering the
flipped learning pedagogy in curriculum development.  

Please email Di Warren (diana.warren@sydney.edu.au) by Monday 9am if you
would like lunch (rice paper rolls, sandwiches, fruit) provided.


11-12 A Flipped Classroom Model to Teaching First Year Undergraduate Courses (Rena
Bokosmaty) 

12-1 Lunch   

1-2 Designing Effective Flipped Learning Experiences (A/Prof Abelardo Pardo) 


Speakers: Rena Bokosmaty is a postgraduate student researching flipped learning in
Chemistry.  A/Prof Abelardo Pardo specialises in technology enhanced learning in the
School of Electrical and Information Engineering.  

Abstract1: In the last decade, the Flipped Classroom Model (FCM) has received increased
recognition for revolutionising traditional didactic teaching.  This talk will outline
the use of the FCM to renew the teaching style in first year undergraduate chemistry
courses.  These courses blend and integrate the use of guided-inquiry based learning
activities with online learning activities to promote an active, student-centred
learning environment with increased student-instructor and peer interactions.
Personalised student support has been embedded in these courses leading to improvements
in retention and student learning outcomes.  This design has the potential to influence
future initiative and provides valuable insight on how this FCM could be used and
implemented in wider disciplines particularly in mathematics courses.  

Abstract2: Student engagement is one of the indicators we usually focus when trying to
improve the overall quality of a learning experience.  The so-called flipped learning
strategy proposes scheduling tasks for students to prepare a face-to-face session.
There is increasing evidence showing that when properly done, this strategy does
increase student satisfaction, but these findings are very sensitive to the learning
context.  In this talk we will explore an example of a flipped learning experience in
the context of engineering education including techniques and design suggestions that
can be applied to a wide variety of scenarios.


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