Robert C. Haraway, III

I am a postdoctoral research associate in Mathematics at the University of Sydney working with Stephan Tillmann on convex projective structures on surfaces after Fock and Goncharov.

I am interested in academic positions beginning after July 2017. Here is a rough CV.

My email address is robert.haraway@sydney.edu.au.

My office doesn't have a phone.

My office address is

        Robert Haraway
Carslaw Bldg F07
Sydney University, NSW 2006
Australia

If you want my undivided attention, my office is Carslaw 827.

Research

Here is my most recent preprint: Tessellating the moduli space of convex projective structures on the once-punctured torus

The code associated with this and other papers is at my GitHub repository.

I have been working with Tom Crawford, Dave Gabai, Rob Meyerhoff, Nate Thurston, and Andrew Yarmola on enumerating cusped hyperbolic 3-manifolds of low cusp area.

I have just started working with Neil Hoffman and Maria Trnkova on an algorithm to tell whether or not one hyperbolic 3-manifold is a Dehn filling of another.

I have worked often with the program SnapPy. So I wrote the following explanation for why I use it. It's based on a talk I have given at our grad student seminar.

Why I Like SnapPy and Why You Should Too

I gave a successful talk on the Chern-Gauss-Bonnet theorem at our graduate student seminar here. I have typed up notes for the talk here.

Teaching

I have always loved explaining math to anyone within earshot. Instead of discussing math, I tend to proclaim it loudly, a habit that is a nuisance in quiet dining establishments but effective in a classroom.

Here are some clarifying notes on fluid flow I typed up in spring 2011 for my section (and for myself):

Notes on flow rate.
Here are some notes on convergence of improper integrals.
Some tips on the comparison test.

As a graduate student I attempted to develop a stripped-down rigorous approach to integral calculus based on the measure theory of the plane. The experience showed me what difficulty students can have with even the most well-digested formality.

At the time I was enamored of the writings of Dijkstra and van Gasteren on aesthetics and methodology in mathematical practice. I still have their writings as my standard, and would like to see a pedagogically effective calculus text along these lines, if not write one myself.

Other Endeavors

I was an active member of the laity here.

I can play the guitar.

Like the world of a science-fiction story, a system of beliefs need not be highly credible---it may be as wild as you like, so long as it is not self-contradictory---and it should lead to some interesting difficulties, some of which should, in the end, be resolved.

Carl E. Linderholm, Mathematics made difficult